"True wisdom, as the fruit of self-examination, dialogue and generous encounter between persons, is not acquired by a mere accumulation of data which eventually leads to overload and confusion, a sort of mental pollution. Real relationships with others, with all the challenges they entail, now tend to be replaced by a type of internet communication which enables us to choose or eliminate relationships at whim, thus giving rise to a new type of contrived emotion which has more to do with devices and displays than with other people and with nature. Today’s media do enable us to communicate and to share our knowledge and affections. Yet at times they also shield us from direct contact with the pain, the fears and the joys of others and the complexity of their personal experiences. For this reason, we should be concerned that, alongside the exciting possibilities offered by these media, a
deep and melancholic dissatisfaction with interpersonal relations, or a harmful sense of isolation, can also arise." (Pope Francis, Laudato Si’, #47.)

 

 

Course: Thomas Aquinas on Faith

Rev Dr Andrew Murray sm
JAndrew Murray sm
Starts 10am Tues 3 March
In his treatment of the virtues in Summa Theologiae I-II qq. 55-67, Thomas divides them into the intellectual, moral and theological virtues. The theological virtues are faith, hope and charity (see 1 Corinthians 13:13). Although a less agreeable term in English, they are so named because their object is God (Theos), they are infused by God, and they are made known to us by Divine Revelation (q. 62, a. 1).

This course (the first of three in the series)

will involve a careful reading of a selection of Saint Thomas Aquinas’s writings on faith, centred on Summa Theologiae II-II qq. 1 – 16. Students will be introduced to Thomas and instructed in how to read his work. Thomas deals with faith as precepts or content, as a human act, and as a virtue. We will follow these distinctions and see Thomas justify the definition of the virtue of faith in Hebrews 11: 1, ‘Faith is the substance of things to be hoped for, the evidence of things that appear not’ and reconcile it with other definitions of his time.

Andrew Murray is a Marist Father, who spent most of his life teaching philosophy, first at Catholic Theological Union and then at Catholic Institute of Sydney. He maintains a special interest in Thomas Aquinas and Aristotle.

Presenter: Rev Dr Andrew Murray sm
Where: Aquinas Academy, Level 5, 141 Harrington Street, The Rocks, Sydney
When: Four Tuesday mornings, 10am - 12noon, 3 - 24 March 2020
Cost: $150/person (including printed readings and notes)

Nobody will be turned away simply because they cannot afford to pay. Offer a donation if you cannot pay the full registration fee.

For further information please telephone 02 9247 4651 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please register before the course starts so that notes will be available.

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