"It is troubling how many people expect applause, recognition, when they have not even begun to learn an art or craft. Instant success is the order of the day; 'I want it now!' I wonder whether this is not part of our corruption by machines. Machines do things very quickly and outside the natural rhythm of life, and we are indignant if a car doesn't start at the first try. So the few things that we still do, such as cooking (though there are TV dinners!), knitting, gardening, anything at all that cannot be hurried, have a very particular value." (May Sarton, Journal of a Solitude, W W Norton, 1973, 15.)

Breaking the family legacy of silence over the Third Reich

JAlexandra Senfft

Nearly 70 years after being executed as a war criminal, the memory of Third Reich ambassador to Slovakia, Hanns Ludin, continues to weigh on his descendants. His granddaughter Alexandra Senfft has broken the family silence.

The room at the Literaturhaus Foundation in Munich, the prosperous Bavarian capital, is packed for a debate hosted by the Institut für Zeitgeschichte.The institute was founded in 1940 to promote research on the National-Socialist dictatorship with respect to the memory of Germany’s Nazi past contained in family histories.

Don’t ignore family history. Read more